Georgetown University home page Search: Full text search Site Index: Find a web site by name or keyword Site Map: Overview of main pages Directory: Find a person; contact us About this site: Copyright, disclaimer, policies, terms of use Georgetown University home page Home page for prospective students Home page for current students Home page for alumni and alumnae Home page for family and friends Home page for faculty and staff
Navigation bar Navigation bar
Navigation bar
News, Calendars, and Events » Calendars » Master Calendar » Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology, Department of
Seminar Series: Dr. Sally A. Moody
Schedule information
Event Seminar Series: Dr. Sally A. Moody
When Tuesday, April 16, 2013 from 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Where Basic Science Building 341 (Library)
Event details
Details “What the embryo can tell us about
NSCs: a tale of two stem cells”

Dr. Sally A. Moody
Professor of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology
George Washington University
School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Summary: A large number of transcription factors regulate the earliest steps of neural development in the embryo, from induction of neural ectodermal precursor cells to their transition to committed neural plate stem cells to their differentiation into neurons and glia. A key gene in the regulatory network that controls this developmental progression is FoxD4, a member of the forkhead box (Fox) family of transcription factors. Knock-down experiments in Xenopus embryos show that it is required for the expression of eleven other early neural transcription factor genes. Experimentally increasing FoxD4 levels has three different effects on these genes: 1) it up-regulates genes that maintain a neural ectodermal precursor state; 2) it transiently down-regulates neural plate stem cell genes; and 3) it down-regulates genes that promote the onset of neural progenitor cell differentiation These different effects indicate that the developmental functions of FoxD4 are to maintain neural ectodermal precursors in an immature, proliferative state, and to counteract premature neural stem/progenitor cell differentiation. Because it both up-regulates and down-regulates genes, we characterized the regions of the FoxD4 protein that are specifically involved in these transcriptional functions, and show that these domains are conserved across vertebrates. I will present preliminary studies that indicate that FoxD4 has a similar important role in converting mouse embryonic stem cells to a neural fate.
Access » This event has been marked as open to the public.
Contact Juanita Chipani Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology office, x71512
Sponsors Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology
Calendar Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology, Department of
» Information about this calendar
» Other events on this calendar
» All events on the Master Calendar

Navigation bar Navigation bar
Georgetown University Search: Full text search Site Index: Find a web site by name or keyword Site Map: Overview of main pages Directory: Find a person; contact us About this site: Copyright, disclaimer, policies, terms of use