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News, Calendars, and Events » Calendars » Master Calendar » Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology, Department of
Seminar Series: Dr. Juergen Bosch
Schedule information
Event Seminar Series: Dr. Juergen Bosch
When Tuesday, April 30, 2013 from 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Where Basic Science Building 341 (Library)
Event details
Details 'Structural Characterization and inhibition of the Plasmodium Atg8-Atg3 interaction”

Dr. Juergen Bosch
Johns Hopkins University
Bloomberg School of Public Health
Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute

Summary: Malaria has been a human health concern for centuries, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Nevertheless, our repertoire of medication to treat the disease has been very limited, and emerging resistance of the malaria parasite Plasmodium has further restricted the use of current medications. The most recent reports indicating artemisinin resistance in Cambodia are indeed alarming and underscore the critical importance of exploring novel pathways for interfering with the life cycle of the malaria parasite.
Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been a powerful tool to study protein ligand interactions. We utilize this technique for small molecule screening (~150 Da) to identify fragment molecules that are capable of binding near a specific protein site. We have developed a method, which we termed differential fragment SPR (DF-SPR). In the present study, we utilized our approach to identify two small molecule fragments capable of inhibiting the essential protein-protein interaction of the autophagic proteins Atg8 and Atg3 from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. These fragments provide a starting point for developing larger drug-like molecules. Furthermore, the protein- protein interaction inhibition assay was employed to discover additional small molecule inhibitors of a site specific to the Plasmodium parasite, but absent in the human homolog of Atg8. Small-molecules derived from our studies may represent useful tools for further dissecting and analyzing the autophagy pathway in Plasmodium and other apicomplexan species.
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Contact Juanita Chipani Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology office, x71512
Sponsors Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology
Calendar Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology, Department of
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